Article review: “Occupare, to seize: expanding the potential of occupation in contemporary practice” by Robert Pereira (2015)

Article review: “Occupare, to seize: expanding the potential of occupation in contemporary practice” by Robert Pereira (2015)

There is an increasing paradigm shift towards including occupation (and defining it) within the wider professional OT theories, research and philosophies. Pereira looks at how we understand the term occupation in our professional language.

The etymology (origin of the word) is occupatio Latin noun for occupation. However when we talk about occupation it isn’t as a noun, it is as a verb where we describe to occupy, to possess, to take control of, etc. Therefore the Latin verb occupare (to occupy) is more representative of our use of the word occupation, he argues. When we think of occupation as something ‘doing’ rather than a ‘description’, it can influence how we think about it in everyday life; rather than focusing on what is being done in an isolated occupation task, we can think of the purpose of the goals achieved through occupation.

OTs may be unintentionally limiting their practice by misunderstanding the term occupation to mean occupatio and not occupare.

otter dictionary

Basically, try thinking of the term occupation as a verb rather than a noun, and see how it changes your perception of situations for example when applying OT models to practice.

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Source:

Robert Pereira (2015). Occupare, to seize: expanding the potential of occupation in contemporary practice. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal (2015) 62, 208–209

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