Focusing on Occupation: looking at some OT News articles

Focusing on Occupation: looking at some OT News articles

Adapting recipes
People with LD struggle with more complex or abstract elements of recipes, and recipes often assume certain knowledge such as preheating the oven or how to prepare the vegetables. The OT devised a cook book specially for LD that they could follow easily. They involved different experts to consult on areas outside of her expertise, eg food safety or nutrition.
An OT by another name?
An OT is based at carpal tunnel syndrome clinic, and is performing surgical procedures such as steroid injections usually carried out by nurses. Blurring of the traditional OT role scope…. but OT cannot prescribe so she needs a prescription authorised by another health professional before she can carry out injections. Benefit of the role is that it increases access for patients to this treatment. Patients can discuss treatment and leave feedback on an innovative website, which also has a self-diagnosis questionnaire for CTS. (www.carpal-tunnel.net)
From OT to case manager
Ot went from to spinal injury case manager. She used her transferable skills as discharge planner to organise care for spinal injury patients. It involves a lot of liaising with other agencies such as DWP, councils, etc, and beiong able to advocate on the patients’ behalf if they re vulnerable (eg homeless, MH).
Let me in
Self-care is not just hygiene, it has therapeutic benefits like motivation, self-soothing and confidence. In a MH inptaient ward, should males be allowed to join in on female self-care sessions? Do they have a right to that as an occupation, or is it ruining the safe space for females to discuss their bodies without judgement? Self care is large part of our daily routine and intrinsically linked to our sense of self and confidence.

Discussion points

  • –What did you learn?
  • –What did you want to know more about?
  • –What is the innovative element?
  • –Why is it needed?
  • –What added value comes from occupational therapy involvement?
  • –Has an occupational perspective shaped the innovation? To what extent?

 

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References- articles from OT News magazine

Delaney K (2014) Adapting recipes. OT News July, 38-39

Kaile E (2014) An OT by another name? OT News November, 30-31

Newland J (2014) From OT to case manager. OT News November, 30-31

Vickerstaffe R (2014) Let me in. OT News. July, 40

 

 

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How do I get OT shadowing experience? What do they ask at OT MSc course interviews? And other questions.

How do I get OT shadowing experience? What do they ask at OT MSc course interviews? And other questions.

The lowdown

Recently I got to represent Occupational Therapy at a postgraduate event, and it was great being able to help future OT students by offering some advice here and there. A lot of them commented that it was really helpful having current students there, as well as the University’s admission tutors, and it made me cast my mind back to the stressful months & weeks before my interview when I’d have sat through the every episode of Big Bang Theory in return for a student godmother to ask three questions to.otter student

Below are some of the most common questions together with the advice I gave:

How do I get OT shadowing experience?

You can try contacting local hospitals’ OT departments and asking them. However in my experience, the success rate for people obtaining shadowing experience this way is low. A better way is to use your existing contacts, and think outside the box. By this I mean think about who you already know, and think about all the places where OTs work (clue: it’s not just hospitals).

Some ideas are:

Traditional settings– hospitals, outpatient clinics, schools, nurseries, supported living facilities, day centres for people with learning disabilities, community health teams, hand clinics.

Non-traditional settings– mental health/psychiatric facilities, equine therapy/animal assisted therapies, assistive technology centres, research labs, prosthetic/orthotic clinics, chronic pain management clinics, palliative care/hospices, oncology depts, military hospitals/rehab centres, private schools, independent practitioners, prisons/criminal justice system, vocational rehabilitation, community-based or mental health outreach teams, A&E.

OTs are generally acknowledged to be the nicest people you’ll ever meet. The ones that I contacted ranged from willing-to-help to bent-over-backwards-to-offer-clinical-contact-and-photocopied-relevant-book-pages-for-me. Even if you don’t have a family member who’s an OT, ask around if anyone knows of one and you will be surprised. Then be shameless in approaching them directly for help! The worst they can do is politely decline, but I guarantee they won’t. Read more

Conducting a literature review: Quality reviewing a research article “Strategies used by older women with intellectual disability to create and maintain their social networks: An exploratory qualitative study” by Mackenzie & White (2015)

Conducting a literature review: Quality reviewing a research article “Strategies used by older women with intellectual disability to create and maintain their social networks: An exploratory qualitative study” by Mackenzie & White (2015)

I’ve chosen to review the quality of a piece of qualitative research titled “Strategies used by older women with intellectual disability to create and maintain their social networks: An exploratory qualitative study” by Katharine White and Lynette Mackenzie. I chose this because prior to starting my Masters I worked for a social inclusion charity with people with learning disabilities, so I was interested in whether the results were something that could have potentially influenced my work there.

thinking otter

This article is a research paper and not an opinion piece, which you can tell by the fact that it has an Abstract, collates data methodically from a subject group (Method section), analyses it (Data Analysis/ Results sections), and then draws conclusions based on the factual results (Discussion, Implications for Occupational Therapy sections).

The authors are Katharine White who is an Occupational Therapist with the Department of Aging, Disability & Care in Sydney, and Lynette Mackenzie who is an Associate Professor at the University of Sydney. They are both interested in researching the effects of aging on disabled individuals and this is plausible as Mackenzie is part of the ‘Aging and Health Research Team’ at the university and White currently specialises in aging and disability in her job role.

They have not declared any conflicts of interests and the research was not funded by anyone, but it was given ethical approval by the University of Sydney. It’s important to check these details because if the sponsor or researcher has a vested interest in the results of the study it’s possible they will be intentionally or unintentionally biased- for example the selection criteria for subjects may be manipulated in favour of one result, or only positive findings are published. Read more

About me

About me

I’m a postgraduate student completing a Master’s degree in Occupational Therapy, to become a qualified therapist with the HCPC (Health and Care Professions Council).

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I’m a student member of the Royal College of Occupational Therapists & British Association of Occupational Therapists.OT studentI also hold a BSc (Hons) in Psychology and a Certificate in Health & Social Care.

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