Trends in the Private Sector

Trends in the Private Sector

Money from us (from our taxes) is passed to the government, which is passed down to the NHS to fund it. But how does the NHS department should get which money? And which departments should exist and get funded by the NHS at all?  How are private companies involved if the NHS is a public organisation?  The system set up to decide how the NHS’ money is spent is complicated, and it’s easiest if you just watch this video to understand:

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Stroke Terminology

Stroke Terminology

There are a lot of medical latin-sounding words used to describe the different stroke symptoms. Below is a list together with the way that I remember them.

In brackets is (Ph) or (M) to indicate whether the symptom is physical or mental. Physical could be movement or sensation; and Mental means cognitive processes such as perception or attention.

Vision

Around 40% of the brain is actually involved with vision, since it includes ocular motor movement, planning of these movements, receipt of the visual information, processing of it and then decisions made on the visual information – these decisions could be visuospatial, emotional etc.

Hemianopia (Ph) (hemi=half;   plegia=paralysis)

Loss of vision in either L or R half of both eyes. So not loss of vision in left eye, but loss of left visual field in both eyes. The information from one side is not transmitted to the brain.

Neglect (M)

The information from eyes is being transmitted to the brain, but information for one side is ‘ignored’ or not processed by the brain.

Diplopia (Ph) (diplo=double; op=eye)

Double vision.

Nystagmus (Ph)

Continuous uncontrolled eye movements, seen with involuntary flickering movements of the eyes either L-R or up-down.

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A day in the life of an OT…

A day in the life of an OT…

Occupational Therapists work with an astonishing range of clients and situations. Below is an anecdotal list of different types of OTs I have met or worked with, noting the similarities and differences between their specialisms and working environments.

working-otter

Independent self-employed OT

OTs who have set up their own practice, for example one who provides assessment and treatment for children with autism or cerebral palsy. These are often in ‘role-emerging’ areas such as home adaptation consultancy for housing associations (eg http://www.viva-access.com/), or providing animal therapy services (eg www.nurture-dogs.co.uk).

Essex County Council

OTs are self-employed and work on a freelance basis. Jobs are put out by the council and OTs accept them as they wish; they are priced according to how complex or faraway the patient is. A difference here is that OTs therefore work independently which means they don’t have support of a team, must achieve their supervision needs independently, and ensure tax is paid. On the flip side it is a very flexible way of working as you can accept or decline work as you wish on a a week-to-week basis, balancing how much time you have spare vs how much money you wish to earn.

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